• The conference At a glance

    Held from 10:00 am - 5:00 pm in Peabody Hall

    Please use the links to navigate to different sections for more details.

    10:00-11:15 am, Peabody 110

    Meet presenters and learn about findings from research conducted on campus.

    11:15 am-12:30 pm, Peabody 210

    Come grab a few slices of FREE pizza (in Peabody 210) and take your lunch to go and attend the following sessions:

     

    Data Blitz presentation session in Peabody 206

     

    Workshop on Data Management presented by A. Solomon Kurz and Kate Kellum in Peabody 209

    12:30-2:20 pm, Peabody 206

    • 12:30-1:30, Getting your Ducks in a Row: How to Prepare for Graduate School Applications

      These talks are primarily designed for undergraduate psychology majors to learn more about psychology graduate school options and how best to prepare their application materials.

      • 12:30-12:55: What's your path?
      • 1:00-1:20: Paperwork Prep
    • 1:30-2:20, Firsthand Experience: How to Get Involved Now and What it Looks like Later

      A brief overview of the current research lab departmental offerings, followed by live Q&A panels with current undergraduates and graduate students on their experiences

      • 1:30-1:35: Survey of UM Psychology Research Labs
      • 1:40-2:00: Panel with the In-Betweens: Undergrads that have been accepted to graduate programs
      • 2:00-2:20: Current Graduate Student Panel: What graduate school is REALLY like!

    12:30-1:50 pm

    Symposium A: Social Development, Peabody 202

    • Giving Wings But Keeping Them Clipped: The Relationship Between Overprotective Parenting and Student Well-Being During the Transition to College
    • Little Philosophers: Assessing and Prompting Philosophical Reasoning With Children
    • Gender and Desired Change in Adolescent and Young Adult Romantic Relationships: Examining Topic Specificity and Links to Communication Withdrawal
    • Examining the Potential Role of Socioeconomic Status Biases on Perception of Political Candidates

    Symposium B: Clinical Topics, Peabody 209

    • Perceptions of Headache Trigger Potency
    • Behavioral Inhibition Sensitivity and a Tendency to Avoid
    • The Impact of Event Scale-6 (IES-6): A study in serious mental illness
    • The Significance of Meaning to Conceptualizations of Resilience and Posttraumatic Growth: Strengthening the Foundation for Research and Practice  

    2:00-3:20 pm

    Symposium C: Intergroup Perceptions, Peabody 202

    • Is your Sexism showing? Ambivalent attitudes of Greek and Non-Greek Undergraduates
    • The Effect of Positive Affect and Threat on Group Dynamics
    • Children's Perspective of Skin Tone
    • A proposed model of internalized racism, ethnicity, and perceived racism

    Symposium D: Pedagogy/Methodology Concerns, Peabody 209

    • Fixed and Growth Mindset in Undergraduate Students: Impacts on Academic Achievement and Resilient Behaviors
    • Let's Discuss: Group Size, Course Performance, & Enjoyability in an Interteaching Class
    • Improving online survey behavior: Take two
    • Validation of a Brief Screening Instrument for Psychopathology in Adults

    2:30-3:30 pm, Peabody 206

    Symposium E: Ew, Gross, and Yuck! Peabody 206

    • Disgust and its relation to fight, flight, freeze tendencies
    • Predicting behavioral avoidance with disgust sensitivity, anxiety sensitivity, and emotion regulation: Preliminary analyses
    • Disgust domains and fear of contamination predict safety behavior usage in an analogue sample
    • Scrupulosity, trauma, and disgust:  Assessing the potential relation between religiosity, trauma symptoms, and moral disgust

      3:45-4:00 pm, Peabody 206

      The following awards will be recognized at the conference.

      • Undergraduate Taylor Medal Awards
      • Graduate Research Achievement Award
      • Faculty Mentor of the Year Award
      • Best Poster Presentation Award
      • Best Oral Presentation Award
      • Best Data Blitz Presentation Award
      • Psi Chi Student Choice Award

      4:00-5:00 pm, Peabody 206

      Dr. Hunt is a Professor of Psychology and Faculty Affiliate at the Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Program at the College of William and Mary. She is well-known for her work on developmental psychobiology, the neural basis of memory, and how alcohol and fetal alcohol syndrome influence cognition.

       

      Her talk is entitled, "Of Mice and Men (and Zebrafish): Modeling Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder." Join us for her engaging talk and help us welcome Dr. Hunt to the UM Psychology department.

    • 10:00 - 11:30, Poster presentations

      Peabody 110, located on the bottom floor of Peabody Hall (down the stairs from the main floor)

      Biochemical and behavioral effects of environmental enrichment on strain-dependent vulnerability to anxiety and depression

      Sydney M. Anchor, Mary K. Jourdan, & Kenneth J. Sufka

       

      Increased attention has been directed towards determining how environment interacts with genetics on the manifestation of stress-related disorders. This study investigates the differential effects of an enriched versus impoverished environment on endpoints of depression between stress-vulnerable and stress-resilient strains in the chick anxiety-depression model. Our results indicate that the differential effects of mild stress are dependent on genetic predisposition to stress vulnerability.

      Identifying What Matters: Comparing Four Methods of Values Identification​

      Peter Andes, Emmie R. Hebert, K. Kate Kellum, & Kelly G. Wilson

       

      This study evaluated four methods of identifying values by comparing within-subject ratings of participant-generated values stimuli. The data suggest a slight advantage to having the participants choose from a list of presented values as an effective and simple preparation for values identification.

      Let's Discuss Disgust: Preschoolers Understanding of Moral Disgust in Relation to Physical Disgust

      Bailey Bracken, Tonya Vandenbrink, & Stephanie E. Miller

       

      We examined how moral disgust emerges and develops in relation to physical disgust in preschoolers. Children were exposed to stories that related to either physical disgust, moral disgust, or negative neutral events and asked to rate each story on a disgust and a bad Likert scale. Results show that while all children understand physical disgust, moral disgust seems to be emerging around the age of 4. In addition, children draw on facial cues when judging unfamiliar situations.

      Creative Grit: the Relationship between Creativity and Persistence in Adults and Children​

      Kristin A. Carpenter, Brittany N. Avila, & Stephanie E. Miller

       

      Research has shown that adults undervalue their creativity. The current study replicated these finding in adults and found the same to be true of children in first grade. Children in fourth grade however, were not shown to undervalue or overvalue persistence.

      The Relationship Between Smoking Behavior and Affective Distress in College Students​

      Kristin A. Carpenter, Emily M. Moquin, Daniel G. Rogers, & Todd A. Smitherman

       

      The current study investigated the relationship between smoking behavior and affective distress measured by the DASS-21. Smokers rated higher levels of anxiety, depression, and stress than non-smokers. Among smokers, no relationship was found between smoking frequency and DASS-21 subscales.

      Mediation in Headache Variables: Using Self-Efficacy as a Mediator of the Relationship Between Headache Frequency and Disability​

      Skylar R. Cochran, Nathaniel R. Greene, & Todd A. Smitherman

       

      The present study uses the process approach to determine if headache management self-efficacy (HMSE) mediates the relationship between headache frequency and disability. Results indicate that HMSE is a mediator of this relationship and suggest that self-efficacy training may be an asset for headache sufferers wishing to offset their disability.

      Close Relationships, the Self-Concept, and Health Behaviors in College Students​

      Erin D. Fowler & Elicia C. Lair

       

      This study explores whether indirect relationships exists between close relationship satisfaction, the self-concept, and disordered eating or alcohol consumption. Using a survey completed by UM students and conditional process modeling, an indirect relationship was observed between close relationship dissatisfaction, a lower self-concept, and higher reports of disordered eating. A relationship was not observed among close relationship satisfaction, the self-concept, and alcohol consumption.

      Looking Good or Being Good? Parenting Goals and Positive Parenting Outcomes​

      Julian D. Fuentes, Victoria D. Mathias, Nathaniel R. Greene, C. Veronica Smith, & Carey B. Dowling

       

      The present study examines outcomes associated with parents' motivations for interacting with their college-aged children. Data were collected from parents of rising college freshmen. Participants completed self-report measures of basic need satisfaction, parenting goals, helicopter parenting, worry about their child's transition to college, and life satisfaction.

      The Role of Emotion Regulation and Gender in the Development of Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms​

      Cayla S. Hari, Brooklee Tynes, & Danielle J. Maack

       

      The main goal of this study was to understand how emotion regulation and gender may play a role in the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms. Emotion regulation difficulties and PTSS were positively correlated. Gender was not significantly correlated with emotion regulation difficulties or PTSS.

      Who Swipes Right? Evaluations of the Male Feminist​

      Devin E. Jewell, Victoria D. Mathias, & C. Veronica Smith

       

      The main goal of this study was to examine whether or not people perceive feminist men to be interpersonally attractive and likeable. We found that participants rated a self-proclaimed feminist man as less likeable and less attractive when compared to a man who does not mention anything about feminism at all.

      Loneliness, Meaning in Life, and Depressive Symptomology in College Students

      Abigail N. Oehler & Danielle J. Maack

       

      This study investigated relations between meaning in life, loneliness, and depression in college students. Self-report measures of the constructs were completed. Meaning in life, loneliness, and depression were all found to significantly correlate with one another. Furthermore, loneliness was the only unique predictor of depressive symptomology.

      Creative Minds: The Relationship between Cognitive Flexibility and Creativity​

      Saraid D. Racicot, Brittany N. Avila, & Stephanie E. Miller

       

      Creativity plays an important role in problem solving. The current study looked at cognitive flexibility and creative fluency in adults and children. Adults and fourth graders, with higher cognitive flexibility generated more creative responses than those with lower cognitive flexibility. This relationship was not found in first graders.

      Suicidality Among Pregnant Women: Preliminary findings​

      Miranda N. Rines & Danielle J. Maack

       

      Rates of suicidality in pregnancy are alarming. The present study assessed suicidality in pregnant women at an OBGYN clinic in Tupelo, MS and found rates of suicidality at 5%. Endorsement of suicidality was seen across ethnicity, age, gestational period, and education level.

      The effects of THC in a recurrent migraine model in rats​

      Blake A. Sowers, Kenneth J. Sufka, Hannah M. Harris, & Mary K. Jourdan

       

      This study investigated the analgesic effects of THC in a rodent model of recurrent migraine. Rats received 4 nitroglycerin-induced migraine episodes every third day for 12 days. Endpoints of photosensitivity, activity, orbital tightening, and tactile allodynia were assessed. Migraine severity increased over the course of the four episodes, pointing toward chronification and an important step in model validation. However, no drug treatment significantly attenuated migraine-related endpoints.

      Extending the Executive Function and Social Understanding Relationship to Toddlers​

      Karina Turner, Tonya Vandenbrink, & Stephanie E. Miller

       

      This study examined the relationship between executive functioning (EF) and social understanding in toddlers. To asses social understanding we used helping paradigms with 18 and 24 month old children. Results show that higher EF performance was related to more instances of helping behavior.

      College Students' Opinions on Parenting​

      Anne O. Waller & Carey B. Dowling

       

      This research study sought to determine if college students' opinions of parenting practices, especially towards the use of corporal punishment, change over the course of the semester. Results showed that students who were presented with both information on the negative effects of corporal punishment and positive parenting alternatives, show a larger decrease in their support of corporal punishment than students enrolled in other psychology classes.

      Enhancing Translational Relevance in a Murine Model of Cisplatin-Induced Neuropathy Using a Novel Arena Apparatus​

      Jontae D. Warren, Jessica A. Cucinello, Patrick L. Oellerich, & Kenneth J. Sufka

       

      In clinical populations of people with neuropathic pain from cisplatin, studies show spontaneous pain is a more accurate depiction of the allodynic (a previously non-painful stimulus that becomes painful) pain patients experience. The novel arena apparatus with two 1/2 fields was constructed in hopes to quantify spontaneous tactile allodynia in a chronic pain model of CIN mice. Ultimately, the study looked to enhance the translational relevance of drug screening assays in chronic pain models.

      Parental Influence on Weight Biases in School-Age Children​

      Emily E. Wasson & Stephanie E. Miller

       

      The present study examines implicit and explicit weight biases in children under 10 and relations to parent health habits and biases. Preliminary data suggests children may demonstrate implicit biases that do not differ with regard to sex and race like adult biases. It is unclear whether explicit biases are demonstrated and if child biases link to parent biases.

    • 11:15-12:30, Lunch, Workshop, & Data Blitz

      The department will provide free pizza and refreshments in Peabody 210. Take your lunch to one of the offered sessions below.

      Workshop: Up your data management game with Excel

      11:30-12:20, Peabody 209

      A. Solomon Kurz & Karen Kate Kellum

       

      We will present basic and advanced data management skills for Microsoft Excel. The session will be primarily aimed at researchers, but also useful for course instructors. Basic topics will include algebraic functions, descriptive statistics, and conditional formatting. More advanced topics will include logical tests, multi-page functions, and nested functions.

      11:30-12:20, Peabody 206

      Moderated by C. Veronica Smith

       

      Enjoy your lunch with bite-sized research presentations. Ten presenters will give 4-minute research talks. See talk titles and abstracts below.

    • 11:30-12:20, data blitz session

      Peabody 206

      11:30-11:35

      If you like it, I like it: Attachment and perceptions of partner sexual satisfaction

      C. Veronica Smith and Camilla S. Øverup

       

      Across two studies, we examined attachment anxiety and avoidance, as well as perceptions of partner satisfaction, in predicting physical and emotional satisfaction after sexual interactions. The results suggest that attachment is related to both types of satisfaction and it is important to consider perceptions of partner sexual satisfaction.

      11:35-11:40

      The Effects of Peer Norms on Desired Number of Sexual Partner

      Rubie M. Peters, Anthony Ahrens, Arthur Shapiro, & Elicia C. Lair

       

      The current study looks at how individuals overestimate their peer's desires, and how peer norms influence an individual's own desires. The study found that participants do significantly overestimate their peers desires, both same-sex and opposite-sex peers. It was also found that there were significant differences in participants desired number of sexual partners between the three normative messages.

      11:40-11:45

      Improvement of parent stress and child behavior through a brief, group-based parent training using the MATCH-ADTC

      Yelena L. Johnson & Tanja Seifen

       

      The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a brief, community-based parent training workshop using modules from a well-established protocol for treating childhood disorders (MATCH-ADTC; Chorpita & Weisz, 2009). Results suggested a significant decrease in parent stress and an increase in positive child behavior ratings, trending toward significance.

      11:45-11:50

      Pregnancy Practice Makes Perfect?: The Effect of Gravidity on Anxiety, Disgust, and Emetophobia Symptoms

      Kathryn L. Prendergast, Brittany S. Sapp, & Danielle J. Maack

       

      Lack of research on the effects of gravidity, or number of previous pregnancies, on psychiatric symptoms in pregnant patients warrants investigation. This study examines the experience of anxiety, disgust and emetophobia symptoms in primigravida versus multigravida. Primigravida were found to experience higher anxiety than multigravida, possibly due to the effects of exposure. No significant differences were found for disgust or emetophobia symptoms.

      11:50-11:55

      Changes in sleep hygiene and sleep patterns in newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients

      Brooklee L. Tynes, Belinda N. Mandress, Kathryn M. Russell, Teresa Hammarback, Megan Loew, & Valerie M. Crabtree

       

      This study sought to examine the longitudinal course of sleep habits in children newly diagnosed with several cancer diagnoses. The primary aim was to understand which domains of sleep hygiene were specifically impacted to inform clinical care of pediatric patients newly diagnosed with cancer. Findings suggest that the unique combination of treatments, environmental changes, and overall burden of illness may work together to contribute to these difficulties.

      11:55-12:00

      Does Emotion Regulation Predict Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms? Preliminary Findings

      Brittany S. Sapp, Danielle J. Maack, & John N. Young

       

      The current study investigated the relation between emotion regulation (ER) and Obsessive-Compulsive (OC) symptoms at a children's psychiatric center. Results indicated that ER difficulties significantly predicted OC symptoms contributing 18.1% unique variance. Further research is warranted to better understand the impact of ER on pediatric OC symptoms.

      12:00-12:05

      Exploring expectancy effects in a rat model of attention

      Zach V. Redding & Karen Sabol

       

      Animals can learn to time the duration of wait periods in reaction time tasks, leading to increased expectation when waiting for long periods. This study explores expectancy effects on attention and lapses in attention in a unique rat model of attention. Preliminary analyses reveal no effects; however, evidence suggests expectancy effects will appear at later stages of the study due to the influence of both salience and training time.

      12:05-12:10

      Flexible Brains

      Melissa M. Miller, Brittany N. Avila, Emmie Hebert, & Stephanie E. Miller

       

      While psychological flexibility and cognitive flexibility have been assumed to be synonymous, the results of our experiment show that they are not related. This means that more research is needed to determine how and why these constructs are different. If these two phenomena are indeed different then we must begin examining them in a new way.

      12:10-12:15

      Prescription opioid and anxiolytic use and trait characteristics of anxiety in an undergraduate sample

      Sara M. Witcraft & Laura J. Dixon

       

      The primary goal of the proposed presentation is to describe anxiety and sociodemographic characteristics of undergraduates who endorse past-year prescription drugs, specifically opioids and anxiolytics. Results suggest that individuals using these medications have higher anxiety symptoms and higher AS than their non-using peers.

      12:15-12:20

      Comparing Cardiovascular Responses to Cognitive and Social Stress among Individuals with Headache

      Yelena L. Johnson & Todd A. Smitherman

       

      The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) is a well-validated stress manipulation but has never been used in headache research despite stress being the most commonly reported headache trigger. The present study experimentally compared the TSST to a cognitive stressor in its ability to elicit cardiovascular reactivity among individuals with migraine or tension-type headache.

    • 12:30-2:20, Featured talks

      Peabody 206

       

      12:30-1:30, Getting your Ducks in a Row: How to Prepare for Graduate School Applications

      These talks are primarily designed for undergraduate psychology majors to learn more about psychology graduate school options and how best to prepare their application materials.

       

      1:30-2:20, Firsthand Experience: How to Get Involved Now and What it Looks like Later

      A brief overview of the current research lab departmental offerings, followed by live Q&A panels with current undergraduates and graduate students on their experiences.

       

      12:30-12:55

      What's your path?

      Heather Bliss & Elise Elligett

       

      Can’t decide what kind of program you should apply to for graduate school? Master’s or PhD? Clinical or Experimental? This talk will give you a brief overview of different options you can take for graduate school.

      1:00-1:20

      Paperwork Prep

      Anandi C. Ehman

       

      Before you even start your graduate school applications, there’s a mound of paperwork that needs to be done. This talk will expose you to the checklist of that paperwork. It will cover topics such as creating a CV (how is it different than a resume?), writing a personal statement, and getting letters of recommendation.

      1:30-1:35

      Survey of UM Psychology Research Labs

      Emmie R. Hebert

       

      Nope, that wasn’t a typo. This unique presentation will give you a taste of the labs in our department that offer opportunities for undergraduate research experience IN JUST 5 MINUTES. If you’ve thought about joining a lab but aren’t sure what they are, definitely find 5 minutes in your schedule to check this out.

      1:40-2:00

      Panel with the In-Betweens: Undergrads that have been accepted to grad programs

      Nathaniel Green, Melissa Miller, Katelyn Sharp, & Lindsay Stewart

       

      After you know what the labs are, you will be able to ask your questions to your peers that have experienced these labs, gone through the graduate school application process, and got accepted into a program!

      2:00-2:20

      Current Graduate Student Panel: What graduate school is REALLY like!

      Clinical Students: Yash Bhambhani, Gina Buillion, Yolanda Rodriguez, Molly Wickenhauser, & Sara Witcraft

      Experimental Student: Tonya Vandenbrink

       

      So, what’s graduate school like after you get in? Here is a good opportunity to find out! Some graduate students from our department will be here to answer any questions you have about their graduate school experience. *NO FACULTY ALLOWED*

    • 12:30-1:50, Symposium A: Social development

      Peabody 202

      Giving Wings But Keeping Them Clipped: The Relationship Between Overprotective Parenting and Student Well-Being During the Transition to College

      Nathaniel R. Greene, Devin E. Jewell, Julian D. Fuentes, Carrie V. Smith, & Carey B. Dowling

       

      Helicopter parenting negatively relates to college student well-being. Here, we show that the helicopter parenting manifests in similar ways between first-generation students and their peers before beginning college. Our study shows that helicopter parenting positively relates to feelings of achievement guilt and worry about the transition to college and negatively correlates with psychological need fulfillment. Thus, helicopter parenting takes a toll even before students begin college.

      Little Philosophers: Assessing and Prompting Philosophical Reasoning With Children

      MaKensey L. Sanders, Stephanie Miller, Steven Skultety, & Karen Kate Kellum

       

      Philosophical ability is thought to involve higher level cognition (Kitchener, 1990). The purpose of this study was to determine if there are links between cognition and the consideration of philosophical ideas in both children and adults and whether philosophical questioning influenced the ability to challenge conformity. The data reflects a marginal correlation between working memory and philosophical reasoning and also between classification in college and philosophical reasoning.

      Gender and Desired Change in Adolescent and Young Adult Romantic Relationships: Examining Topic Specificity and Links to Communication Withdrawal

      Gary C. Glick & Amanda J. Rose

       

      The present study examined communication withdrawal and desired change in adolescent and young adult romantic relationships. Females' desired change centered on who planned activities, attention given to appearance, and openness of communication. Males' desired change centered on going further sexually and spending time with friends. Communication withdrawal was more pronounced when change was desired in especially sensitive topics (e.g., birth control, opposite-gender friends, sexual behavior).

      Examining the Potential Role of Socioeconomic Status Biases on Perception of Political Candidates

      Hunter Sudduth, Emmie Hebert, Karen Kate Kellum, Ryan Kimball, Chad Drake, & Kelly G. Wilson

       

      The current study sought to utilize a behavioral (i.e., IRAP) in the assessment of SES perceptions and their possible influence over voting intentions. The results are suggestive of marginal differences between political affiliations for implicit perceptions of wealth and poverty, with larger differences observed among self-report measures.

    • 12:30-1:50, Symposium B: clinical topics

      Peabody 209

      Perceptions of Headache Trigger Potency

      Katelyn M. Sharpe, Ashley N. Polk, & Todd A. Smitherman

       

      The present study examined perceived headache trigger stimuli, factors influencing perceptions of trigger potency, and accuracy in estimating probability of headache occurrence when exposed to perceived headache triggers. Potency estimates were related to headache frequency and disability.

      Behavioral Inhibition Sensitivity and a Tendency to Avoid

      Daniel J. Pineau & Danielle J. Maack

       

      This study aimed to identify the differences in approach tendencies between individuals who rate highly and lowly on behavioral inhibition system sensitivity. Results indicated that individuals who reported more sensitivity to behavioral inhibition were more likely to avoid novel stimuli then those who were not as sensitive.

      The Impact of Event Scale-6 (IES-6): A study in serious mental illness

      Alexis K. Liberto, John W. Pimperl, Erin M. Buchanan, William P. Deal, & Stefan E. Schulenberg

       

      We sought to replicate the findings of Thoresen et al.'s (2010) development of the IES-6, a six-item abbreviated measure of the Impact of Event Scale'Revised (IES-R), which measures symptoms of posttraumatic stress. While our results did not support the original IES-6 model proposed among individuals with a serious mental illness (SMI), we recognize that a new short form of the IES-R is needed in order to accommodate the DSM-V's four diagnostic criteria for PTSD suggesting a possible IES-8.

      The Significance of Meaning to Conceptualizations of Resilience and Posttraumatic Growth: Strengthening the Foundation for Research and Practice

      Lauren N. Weathers & Stefan E. Schulenberg

       

      Meaning in life is integral to perceiving life as being fulfilling and is a way to adaptively cope with a range of potentially traumatic events throughout one's life. Meaning in life contributes to overall well-being by facilitating awareness of social support, providing a sense of identity and values, facilitating health-promoting behaviors, and inoculating against stress.

    • 2:00-3:20, Symposium C: Intergroup Perceptions

      Peabody 202

      Is your Sexism showing? Ambivalent attitudes of Greek and Non-Greek Undergraduates

      Victoria D. Mathias & C. Veronica Smith

       

      The current research aims to examine if there is a relationship between Gender, Greek affiliation, and Ambivalent Sexism compared to men and women who are not in the Greek system. We are interested in whether involvement in a same-sex social institution is related to levels of hostile or benevolent sexism. Preliminary findings show Greek Positive women report higher levels of ambivalent sexism (hostile & benevolent) towards women compared to Non-Greek women.

      The Effect of Positive Affect and Threat on Group Dynamics

      Lauren N. Jordan & Elicia C. Lair

       

      This study investigated how discrete emotions (pride, awe, contentment, and anxiety) and outgroup threat affect group dynamics. Participants wrote about a time in their life when they felt one of several emotions and they then read a fake newspaper article to induce outgroup threat, ingroup dominance, or no threat. Results indicate that outgroup threat decreases differences between ingroup and outgroup homogeneity, whereas ingroup dominance increases it.

      Children's Perspective of Skin Tone

      Lindsay Stewart, Amanda D. Dortch, Emmie R. Hebert, & K. Kate Kellum

       

      This study is an extension of the original "doll study" conducted by Kenneth and Mamie Clark in 1947 as well as the CNN Pilot Demonstration in 2010. Children were asked to assign negative and/or positive words to cartoon dolls of varying skin-tones. Findings and implications will be discussed.

      A proposed model of internalized racism, ethnicity, and perceived racism

      Yolanda Rodriguez & Alan M. Gross

       

      This study aimed to determine if internalized racism served as a mediator for the relationship between ethnic identity and perceived racism in African-American young adults. Results provided some support for two of the proposed models and challenged previous findings by reflecting the unique composition of the student body at this Southern university.

    • 2:00-3:20, Symposium D: pedagogy/methodology concerns

      Peabody 209

      Fixed and Growth Mindset in Undergraduate Students: Impacts on Academic Achievement and Resilient Behaviors

      Ann Louise Seabrook & Carey Bernini Dowling

       

      The study's goal was to examine the relationships between fixed and growth mindset and resilient behaviors and academic achievement, all in an undergraduate population. Meditational analyses were not run due to a lack of variability in the data; however, the predicted relationship between emotion growth mindset and lower levels of depression symptoms was found, along with the predicted relationship between several resilient behaviors and official semester GPA.

      Let's Discuss: Group Size, Course Performance, & Enjoyability in an Interteaching Class

      Alexandria Leidt, Karen Kate Kellum, & Kelly G. Wilson

       

      This study examined the effects of different sizes of learning groups in a college classroom that includes peer-learning. No differences in quiz scores; however, students rated small group discussions more favorability than the large group discussions.

      Improving online survey behavior: Take two

      A. Solomon Kurz, Samantha L. Knowles, Karen Kate Kellum, & Kelly G. Wilson

       

      Few have investigated ways to detect and intervene on poor survey behaviors in real time. In this study we explored the efficacy of five experimental interventions to improve survey responding. Participants in the experimental conditions generally responded more carefully than those in the control; however the effect size was small.

      Validation of a Brief Screening Instrument for Psychopathology in Adults

      Adam F. Sattler & John Young

       

      This study demonstrates that a new screening instrument accurately assesses 10 common behavioral health conditions in a format that requires little time (less than 9 minutes), expertise, and resources to implement. Given these results, the instrument may facilitate mental health assessment in a variety of applied clinical contexts, such as community mental health settings and primary care clinics.

    • 2:30-3:30, Symposium E: Ew, Gross, and Yuck!

      Peabody 206

       

      Symposium Chair: Danielle J. Maack

      Presenters: Sarah M. Scott, Molly Wickenhauser, Mimi Zhao, & Brooklee Tynes

       

      Disgust is a basic, universal emotion that primarily refers to an object or situation that is found revolting. The primary disgust response is avoidance, in which one rejects or distances oneself from the perceived stimulus. Research has demonstrated that disgust plays a key role in the development and maintenance of various anxiety disorders and associated psychopathology. This symposium will discuss the ways in which individuals tend to respond to disgust along with the relationship between disgust and other psychopathology.

      Disgust and its relation to fight, flight, freeze tendencies

      Sarah M. Scott

       

      Fear has been conceptualized as the underlying emotion of the fight, flight, freeze (FFF) system; however, little is known regarding responses to other emotions, such as disgust. Much research has demonstrated fight and flight to be adaptive in threatening situations with freeze only more recently being studied. The current study explored the self-reported FFF system tendencies in relation to anxiety and disgust sensitivities. Participants included 283 undergraduate students (55.1% female; 68.2% White) from a large southern university. Results indicated that disgust sensitivity was significantly related to both flight (p < .05) and fight (p < .05) responses. However, when assessed separately by different disgust domains (i.e. core, contamination, animal reminder and moral), the moral subscale was not related to any of the FFF domains. Overall, results demonstrated that both flight and fight to be highly associated with the emotion of disgust. Discussion of the findings and future directions in understanding this relation will be presented.

      Predicting behavioral avoidance with disgust sensitivity, anxiety sensitivity, and emotion regulation: Preliminary analyses

      Molly Wickenhauser

       

      Research has exemplified that avoidance of the emotion of disgust contributes to anxiety disorders. Additional factors that influence avoidance and contribute to anxiety disorders include anxiety sensitivity and emotion dysregulation. Few studies have directly assessed these cognitive vulnerabilities together with disgust in the prediction of avoidance behaviors. The present study aimed to examine the role of disgust sensitivity, anxiety sensitivity, and emotion regulation in behavioral avoidance. Participants were undergraduate students (n = 242) from a large Southeastern university. The sample was predominantly female (73.7%), and Caucasian (68.4%) with mean age = 19.07 years. Following consent, participants completed the several self-report measures as part of a larger overall lab study related to disgust and anxiety. Further, participants were asked to complete 8 disgust-related Behavioral Avoidance Tasks (BATs) separated into three steps each. For example, a live earthworm was presented and the participants were asked to approach, touch, and pick up the earthworm. A hierarchical regression revealed that disgust sensitivity predicted behavioral avoidance on the BATs when controlling for anxiety sensitivity and emotion regulation, F (1, 154) = 70.276, p < .001. Discussion of the findings and future directions will be presented.

      Disgust domains and fear of contamination predict safety behavior usage in an analogue sample

      Mimi Zhao

       

      Safety behaviors are a core feature of contamination fear. Studies demonstrate that repeated engagement in safety behaviors (e.g., carrying hand sanitizer) can result in fear maintenance. Given links between disgust and contamination fear, distinct disgust vulnerabilities may also relate to the implementation of safety behaviors. To better understand factors related to safety behavior use, the present study examined the relationship between domains of disgust, contamination fear, and safety behaviors. Undergraduate students (n=135) from a large southern university completed self-report measures of contamination fear, disgust sensitivity, and safety behavior use. A stepwise regression was conducted with the first step including three domains of disgust sensitivity and the second step including contamination fear and the disgust domains. Results from the first step demonstrated both contamination disgust ( = .30, t (135) = 2.93, p = .004) and core disgust ( = .29, t (135) = 2.51, p = .013) predicted safety behavior use. In the second step, contamination fear predicted safety behavior use above and beyond all domains of disgust ( = .58, t (135) = 7.57, p < .001). These results demonstrate that safety behavior use is associated with both fear of disease and contamination disgust, however contamination fear seems to be the only factor maintaining safety behavior use.

      Scrupulosity, trauma, and disgust: Assessing the potential relation between religiosity, trauma symptoms, and moral disgust

      Brooklee Tynes

       

      Research has demonstrated the development of PTSD may be attributed to numerous vulnerabilities, predisposing individuals to the development of the disorder. Disgust, particularly moral disgust, may be one such vulnerability. Moral disgust is a response that occurs when an individual experiences a negative reaction to moral violations or views actions lacking normal human motives. Additionally, scrupulosity, defined as obsessive tendencies in relation to fear of sin and compulsive action to eliminate sin by continuous participation in religious acts, may be a construct associated with moral disgust and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). The purpose of this study was to test the association of moral disgust with scrupulosity and PTSS. Participants were 283 students (42.9% male; 70.3% White) age 18 to 44 years (M=20.0, SD = 2.87) who completed self-report measures of posttraumatic stress, scrupulosity, obsessionality, and moral disgust. Results revealed that scrupulosity was positively correlated with posttraumatic stress symptoms (r= .41), but not moral disgust. Additionally, moral disgust ratings were unrelated to PTSS. Post-hoc analyses suggested that the overall disgust (not separated by domain) did significantly contribute to the regression model. Implications and discussion of these findings will be presented.

    • Awards Ceremony

      3:45-4:00, Peabody 206

      Annual Departmental Achievement Awards

      Marcus Elvis Taylor Medal Recipients, awarded to undergraduates with outstanding academic achievement

       

      Research Achievement Awards, granted to graduate students with outstanding research productivity (sponsored by ORSP)

       

      Faculty Mentor of the Year, to recognize outstanding mentorship by a faculty member

      Conference Awards (sponsored by ORSP)

      Best Poster Presentation

       

      Best Oral Presentation

       

      Best Data Blitz Presentation

       

      Psi Chi Student Choice Award (sponsored by Psi Chi)

    • SUPPORT PSI CHI AND THE UM RESEARCH CONFERENCE

      T-Shirts will be on sale during the conference!

      Show your UM Psychology Pride!

      A limited number of t-shirts will be available for purchase the day of the conference and are priced at $20.00.

    • Keynote Presentation, Dr. Pam Hunt

      4:00-5:00 pm, Peabody 206

      About the Speaker: Dr. Hunt is a Professor of Psychology and Faculty Affiliate at the Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Program at the College of William and Mary. She is well-known for her work on developmental psychobiology, the neural basis of memory, and how alcohol and fetal alcohol syndrome influence cognition. She has won several grants to support her work, and has published numerous peer-reviewed articles in journals such as Behavioral Neuroscience, Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, and Alcohol.

      Of Mice and Men (and Zebrafish): Modeling Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

      More details about the talk will be posted prior to the conference.

    • EXTRAS

      5-minute feedback survey

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      Honor Society for Psychology Majors

      Think about joining Psi Chi! If you meet the eligibility requirements, you can become a member and get more involved in the department. This is a great opportunity for undergraduates looking to pursue a graduate degree in psychology.